[Listing] Singapore Lyric Opera Sings of Nature and Hope at Opera in the Park

The Singapore Lyric Opera (SLO) is proud to present Opera in the Park for the 12th consecutive year on 15 June 2019, Saturday, at 5.30 p.m. The beautiful setting of Shaw Foundation Symphony Stage at the Singapore Botanical Gardens complements this year’s theme, “Nature and Hope”, as families and friends can indulge in a nice picnic while immersing themselves in opera music. 

SLO is grateful for the continuous support of Singapore Botanical Gardens and SPH Gift of Music in bringing opera to  a wider audience.

Audience can expect to enjoy joyful and uplifting arias from several classics such as Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro, Delibes’ Lakmé, Puccini’s Madama Butterfly, J. Strauss’ Die
Fledermaus, Verdi’s Aida and La Traviata.

The audience will also get to enjoy a mini preview of SLO’s upcoming production, Bizet’s Carmen. Jonathan Charles Tay will be singing  “La fleur que tu m’avais”, and Martin Ng will perform the rousing aria, “Votre toast”.

 The concert will also feature soloists from the SLO–Leow Siak Fah Artists Training Programme: Cherie Tse, Zhang Jie, and Chieko Sato. Regular  attendees of Opera in the Park will also be pleasantly surprised by new faces Sim Weiying and Joyce Lee who will be performing a couple of solo arias.

Joshua Tan, an up-and-rising conductor from Singapore, will be leading the SLO Orchestra. The SLO Chorus, Youth Choir, and Children Choir will also make a guest appearance at the concert together with their respective conductors, Terrence Toh and Rose Loh.


OPERA IN THE PARK: Nature & Hope
Conductor: Joshua Kangming Tan
Soloists: Cherie Tse, Zhang Jie, Chieko Sato, Joyce Lee Tung, Sim Weiying, Jonathan Charles Tay, and Martin Ng
SLO Chorus and Youth Choir Conductor: Terrence Toh
SLO Children’s Choir Conductor: Rose Loh

Programme

Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro
• Overture
• Giunse alfin il momento (Sim Weiying)
• Aprite presto aprite (Cherie Tse, Joyce Lee)
• Sull’aria (Cherie Tse, Zhang Jie)
Delibes Lakmé
• The Flower Duet (Joyce Lee, Chieko Sato)

Wagner’s Lohengrin
• Bridal Chorus (SLO Chorus)
J. Strauss Die Fledermaus
• Im Feuerstrom der Reben (Sim Weiying, Jonathan Charles Tay, Cherie Tse, SLO
Chorus & Youth Choir)

Puccini’s Madama Butterfly
• Scuoti quelle fronda di ciliegio (Zhang Jie, Chieko Sato)

Bizet’s Carmen
• La cloche a sonné (SLO Chorus)
• La fleur que tu m’avais (Jonathan Charles Tay)
• Les Voici! (SLO Chorus, Youth Choir & Children’s Choir)
• Votre toast (Martin Ng)

Verdi’s Aida
• Gloria all’Egitto (SLO Chorus, Youth Choir & Children’s Choir)

Verdi’s La Traviata
• Brindisi (All singers)

Programme not in order of performance. Artistes and programme subject to change. This concert is subject to weather conditions.

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Complexnya: Interview with Choreographer Norhaizad Adam

Dance in Situ strives to bring dance out into the community. Their works are inspired by the chosen sites or residential areas that they perform in.

For the fifth edition, Dance in Situ has collaborated with choreographer Norhaizad Adam from P7:1SMA and sound designer Chong Li-Chuan to stage a performance walk around Hong Lim Complex. 

To find out more about the work, I spoke to Norhaizad Adam about his choreographic process. 

Norhaizad Adam (Photo: Shania Regina Santosa)

Could you describe your choreographic process for this production?
After our team’s first site recce of Hong Lim Complex in February 2019, I am immediately drawn to this space. I decided that it will be my priority to invite others to walk with us. The complex’s  architecture brings to my mind a sense of complexity. It may be common flat in plain sight, but a stillness exists. In every decision I make, I refer to the characteristics of Hong Lim Complex.

My choreographic processes are centered on instinct through tasks such as silent walk and artist talk-back. I value my team for considering the site’s presence and behaviour, and how it resonates strongly with each individual. My senses tend to pick up on fleeting and intangible elements which may motivate my choreographic score.

 How do you go about choosing the various locations within Hong Lim Complex for performance?
I am attracted to pockets of public spaces that feels poetic and cinematic. My instinct grows as it is loaded with nostalgic stories and the spaces offer different smells, textures and temperatures. It’s hard to describe in words, but I chose locations where its presence can be felt.

I try to avoid locations that are decorated with commercial and modern elements so as to offer everyone a chance to consider the element of time and an alternative vantage point.

How often were you able to rehearse in the actual space? How did you structure your rehearsals?
We had the privilege to rehearse and immerse in Hong Lim Complex. From February to June 2019, all our rehearsals were on-site. At first, we started with a silent walk to huge areas in the complex. Every level, turn, and corner led us to various routes and gave us different sensations. Eventually, the performance walk route developed through the choreographic process. I hope each space will slowly unfold its intentions, revealing secrets layer by layer.

In my practice, I believe that a site-work should be rehearsed on-site to awaken my senses and imagination. Our ‘Complexnya’ team is lucky to exercise and chit-chat with elderly Hong Lim residents during block parties whilst taking in everything that the space provide and hinders.

Another integral part to the performance is sound design. What was your brief to the sound designer? Could you give us some clues as to what sort of soundscape the audience can look forward to?
I am blessed to work with sound designer, Li-Chuan. In addition to creating soundscapes, based on his generous insights he has definitely expanded my impulses in the work. I am open to give full freedom to my collaborators as I trust Li-Chuan’s instinct and reasoning of what Hong Lim Complex is or used to be. He is present through the entire choreographic process, listening to conversations between dancers.

I also value Li-Chuan’s sense of adventure as he often explores Hong Lim Complex to find hidden sounds and ways of making sounds from objects and traffic. I appreciate Li-Chuan as his approach to sound design does feel like it is coming out from within the cracks in the walls or from a far distance. The interplay between the sounds of the place and Li-Chuan’s sonic input heightens the presence of the place, and adds another dramaturgical layer to the piece.


Complexnya runs from 28 May to 2 June 2019 at Hong Lim Complex. Meeting point is at Chinatown Point KFC. Tickets from Peatix

[Theatre Review] “Flowers” Offers a Subtle but Refreshing Scent

Flowers compels one to reflect on everyday violence.

Flowers
Drama Box
1 May 2019
74 Jalan Kelabu Asap
1‒5 May 2019

Partly due to the current zeitgeist, and partly a coïncidence of production timelines, there have been a slew of shows eager to address issues of gender, harassment, and abuse since last year. A common approach, at least in the shows I have caught, is to state various facts and declare the need for reëducation.

Apart from it being an experiential installation rather than a conventional theatre performance, Flowers (conceived by Han Xuemei in collaboration with playwright Jean Tay, lighting designer Lim Woan Wen, and sound designer Darren Ng) is refreshing because it is more intent on asking questions.

Set in a house within the Holland Village area, audience members are given a cassette player as they listen to a recording of a monologue delivered by Ann Lek, and they wander about a two-storey house for 70 minutes. The monologue details the fraught relationships a woman has with her parents and brother; the known but unspoken violence her father unleashes; and the different expectations placed on her and her brother.

The audience is thus cast as voyeur, investigator, and confidant all at the same time, as we are allowed to open any door and drawer within the house. The quotidian artefacts soon take a life on its own, telling not just the history of the inhabitants, but becoming symbolic extensions of the monologue. For example, the numerous photographs from Officer Cadet School in the brother’s room do not merely tell us that he has served national service, but it also echoes ideas about masculinity and expectations placed on young men.

As such, the physical act of exploring the house parallels the self-reflection that one undergoes. This is enhanced by the evocative, but reticent monologue. If you are expecting a dramatic recount of a violent episode, you will be disappointed. However, the suggestions within the monologue gives one space to fill up the details, perhaps from your own experiences.

This also expands the notion of violence, and how it can be coloured and complicated within a familial dynamic.

The master stroke of the piece comes when, while wandering about, you suddenly chance upon an actor playing the father. He never acknowledges the presence of the audience, but potters about the house, cooking, washing dishes, watering the plants, and watching television.

This sudden inclusion opens up an opportunity for confrontation or reflection. I found myself silently observing the father for any traces of violence, or, at the very least, impatience. My endeavour failed and I soon wondered what I was hoping to achieve.

Why should there be a clear-cut cause and effect? Is the father necessarily a monster, even though he committed a heinous act?  Does the mother have any agency in this dynamic? Where does the buck stop? Do we all also enact violence in our moments of impatience? How do we stop the perpetuation of violence in all its guises? Is it simply a matter of education?

In the cacophony created by stomping on soap boxes and declamations from high horses, the gentle prodding and a space to pause and reflect, as offered by Flowers, may just be a start towards a more productive and sympathetic solution.

Other Reviews

“Drama Box’s Flowers quietly challenges misogyny” by Akshita Nanda, The Straits Times Life! 

“The Wars We Fight in Silence — FLOWERS: Review” by Cheryl Tan, Popspoken

“FLOWERS” by Jocelyn Chng, Centre 42 Citizens’ Reviews

“Review: FLOWERS by Drama Box” by Bak Chor Mee Boy